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re: Grammar in "Left in the Dark"

Posted by:
Dr_Rock 03:52 pm MST 01/26/07
In reply to: re: Grammar in "Left in the Dark" - Dr_Rock 03:47 pm MST 01/26/07

Actually, one last post to answer my own question.
Contractions are grammatically acceptable only if used in a colloquial context!
Whatever that means?

Will

> You're right in that "gonna" is an accepted contraction
> and is in the Oxford Dictionary, but the same rules apply
> for contractions as for slang, which is that they
> shouldn't be used in any formal capacity. A song is hardly
> a formal capacity; and I use "wanna" and "gonna" many
> times in songs or everyday speech. I'll admit that Jim's
> use of this word in this situation is correct, although
> how contractions are covered by the rules of grammer I
> don't know.
>
> The obvious exception to this is the song, "Woulda Shoulda
> Coulda" which should have been banned because, grammer
> aside, it's a steaming pile of shite.
>
> It's late so I'm gonna turn in before I get a chance to
> get started on "Obladee Oblada."
>
> Will
>
> > Hasn't "gonna" become a legit, accepted contraction for
> > "going to" at this point?
> >
> > > I was actually thinking about the use of "gonna," but you
> > > do make some fair and accurate points.
> > >
> > > Will
> > >
> > > > "I can't stand to see it NO more."
> > > >
> > > > How about this nonsensicality:
> > > >
> > > > "When the screws are tightnin'
> > > > and the tears are falling
> > > > I can hear her crying out to be saved
> > > > and like a bolt of lightning I go answer the call
> > > > BUT she's singing like a siren to me over the waves"
> > > >
> > > > It always struck me that Meat sings "but" when he should
> > > > be singing "because." "But" doesn't really make sense in
> > > > context, its almost contradictory to the sentiment being
> > > > expressed.
> > > >
> > > > If memory serves (its been many years), Meat sings it the
> > > > way the lyrics read, too, so its not just Meat messing up
> > > > the line.
> > > >
> > > > > Badly is correct if you want to say that he didn't do a
> > > > > very good job of needing her. If you want to say that he
> > > > > needed her very much then the grammatically correct way of
> > > > > saying it is that he needed her bad (e.g. see Ted Nugent's
> > > > > song "Need You Bad"). However Smeg is correct when he says
> > > > > that this can also mean he needs her to be a bad person.
> > > > > Don't you just love the English language!
> > > > > For a bonus point, can anyone spot the subtle abuse of the
> > > > > English language in the song, "I'm Gonna Love Her For Both
> > > > > of Us?"
> > > > >
> > > > > Will
> > > > >
> > > > > > Badly is correct. It describes how he needs her. If he
> > > > > > needed her bad then bad being an adjective would say that
> > > > > > he needs her to be a bad person... or a naughty person.
> > > > > > For an adverb you ask does it desc ribe the verb. How did
> > > > > > he need her? He needed her badly.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > > Listening to LitD this morning, and this line struck me:
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > I needed you oh so badly tonight
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > "Badly" being an adverb, doesn't this mean that the
> > > > > > > speaker is doing a poor job of "needing."
> > > > > > >
> > > > > > > Shouldn't this properly be "needed you oh so bad" ?


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Previous: re: Grammar in "Left in the Dark" - Dr_Rock 03:47 pm MST 01/26/07
Next: re: Grammar in "Left in the Dark" - Vin 11:28 am MST 01/26/07

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