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re: Grammar in "Left in the Dark"

Posted by:
fallingtofly 08:20 am MST 02/01/07
In reply to: re: Grammar in "Left in the Dark" - Vin 11:35 am MST 01/26/07

It is- if we're talking in old/middle English.

I have a large archive of journals and diaries and receipt (that's receipt as in RECIPE not as in the slip of paper saying what you bought) books dating back a couple of centuries, and goodly appears quite often.

"Withe the flat of the Blade crush ye a goodly amount of henbane, yarrow and motherwort..."



> But furthermore, why the Hell isn't "goodly" a word?????
>
> > Needing her "bad" wouldn't necessarily mean that he needed
> > her to be a bad person. It could refer to THE DEGREE OF
> > NEEDING, as opposed to the ACTUAL ACT OF NEEDING, which is
> > what the adverb "badly" modifies.
> >
> > Example:
> >
> > Hey, dude, how do you need her?
> >
> > I need her bad. ("Bad," in this case, having the
> > colloquial/contextual meaning of "a lot.")
> >
> > "I need her badly," while gramatically correct, as you
> > point out, technically means, "I'm not good at needing
> > her."
> > Its pretty safe to assume that this is not what Jim's
> > speaker means in LitD.
> >
> > Another example:
> >
> > "The man dying in the desert needed water bad." (He
> > didn't need bad water. And there surely is nothing wrong
> > with his ability to need the water; he's needing it just
> > fine. Its the degree to which he needs the water that is
> > being described.)
> >
> > And this chestnut from Jim's own catalog probably best
> > illustrates the difference:
> >
> > "Tonight I really got it bad."
> >
> > Is Jim saying that the way in which she obtained it is
> > sub-par? No, because that would be "Tonight I really got
> > it badly." He's describing the degree to which she got
> > it: "bad."
> >
> >
> > Not that I honestly give a shit. Language is a mutable
> > body of work, most of us butcher the rules routinely,
> > accidentally or otherwise, and as long as we effectively
> > communicate, it doesn't really matter. If we butcher the
> > rules long enough, the butchering becomes the rule, so
> > there.
> >
> > Still, I've always had a soft spot for debating minutiae.
> >
> >
> >
> > > Badly is correct. It describes how he needs her. If he
> > > needed her bad then bad being an adjective would say that
> > > he needs her to be a bad person... or a naughty person.
> > > For an adverb you ask does it desc ribe the verb. How did
> > > he need her? He needed her badly.
> > >
> > > > Listening to LitD this morning, and this line struck me:
> > > >
> > > > I needed you oh so badly tonight
> > > >
> > > > "Badly" being an adverb, doesn't this mean that the
> > > > speaker is doing a poor job of "needing."
> > > >
> > > > Shouldn't this properly be "needed you oh so bad" ?


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