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re: Grammar in "Left in the Dark"

Posted by:
Dr_Rock 03:47 pm MST 01/26/07
In reply to: re: Grammar in "Left in the Dark" - Vin 03:31 pm MST 01/26/07

You're right in that "gonna" is an accepted contraction and is in the Oxford Dictionary, but the same rules apply for contractions as for slang, which is that they shouldn't be used in any formal capacity. A song is hardly a formal capacity; and I use "wanna" and "gonna" many times in songs or everyday speech. I'll admit that Jim's use of this word in this situation is correct, although how contractions are covered by the rules of grammer I don't know.

The obvious exception to this is the song, "Woulda Shoulda Coulda" which should have been banned because, grammer aside, it's a steaming pile of shite.

It's late so I'm gonna turn in before I get a chance to get started on "Obladee Oblada."

Will

> Hasn't "gonna" become a legit, accepted contraction for
> "going to" at this point?
>
> > I was actually thinking about the use of "gonna," but you
> > do make some fair and accurate points.
> >
> > Will
> >
> > > "I can't stand to see it NO more."
> > >
> > > How about this nonsensicality:
> > >
> > > "When the screws are tightnin'
> > > and the tears are falling
> > > I can hear her crying out to be saved
> > > and like a bolt of lightning I go answer the call
> > > BUT she's singing like a siren to me over the waves"
> > >
> > > It always struck me that Meat sings "but" when he should
> > > be singing "because." "But" doesn't really make sense in
> > > context, its almost contradictory to the sentiment being
> > > expressed.
> > >
> > > If memory serves (its been many years), Meat sings it the
> > > way the lyrics read, too, so its not just Meat messing up
> > > the line.
> > >
> > > > Badly is correct if you want to say that he didn't do a
> > > > very good job of needing her. If you want to say that he
> > > > needed her very much then the grammatically correct way of
> > > > saying it is that he needed her bad (e.g. see Ted Nugent's
> > > > song "Need You Bad"). However Smeg is correct when he says
> > > > that this can also mean he needs her to be a bad person.
> > > > Don't you just love the English language!
> > > > For a bonus point, can anyone spot the subtle abuse of the
> > > > English language in the song, "I'm Gonna Love Her For Both
> > > > of Us?"
> > > >
> > > > Will
> > > >
> > > > > Badly is correct. It describes how he needs her. If he
> > > > > needed her bad then bad being an adjective would say that
> > > > > he needs her to be a bad person... or a naughty person.
> > > > > For an adverb you ask does it desc ribe the verb. How did
> > > > > he need her? He needed her badly.
> > > > >
> > > > > > Listening to LitD this morning, and this line struck me:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > I needed you oh so badly tonight
> > > > > >
> > > > > > "Badly" being an adverb, doesn't this mean that the
> > > > > > speaker is doing a poor job of "needing."
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Shouldn't this properly be "needed you oh so bad" ?


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Previous: re: Grammar in "Left in the Dark" - Vin 03:31 pm MST 01/26/07
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